Day 7 ALT (shave off approximately 5 miles by the pass through.)
Day 9 ALT (shave off approximately 6 miles.)
Day 5 BAIL
Day 1 (10.3 Mi)
Day 2 (12.6 Mi)
Day 3 (18.7 Mi)
Day 4 (11.9 Mi)
Day 5 (17.5 Mi)
Day 6 (20.5 Mi)
Day 7 (13.7 Mi)
Day 9 Circumnav
Day 8 CORRECT
Boyd's Key West Campground (Boyd's Key West Campground <br> The campground is located on the east side of Stock Island about a half-mile south of the main highway. It boasts several waterfront tent sites along with a heated pool, laundry facilities, game room and convenience store. You can reserve a site by e-mail (www.boydscampground.com) or, if you are planning to arrive within seven days, you can call directly at (305) 294-1465. Reservations between December 25 and January 1 are not accepted (first come, first serve))
Geiger Key Marina Campground (Geiger Key Marina is located on the east side of Geiger Key just inside Saddlehill Key (305) 296-3553. It offers several amenities such as tent camping, showers, water, laundromat and a restaurant.)
Sugarloaf Key KOA (Krusty On Arrival <br> Camping is at the Sugarloaf Key KOA, 305-745-3549. This full facility commercial campground is located on the Atlantic side of Sugarloaf Key along a well-marked channel. GPS on map is for the boat ramp. Kayakers can stay in a spacious primitive tent area for less than the regular fee. Some paddlers stay at an unauthorized campsite near a collapsed bridge along Tarpon Creek.)
Big Pine Campground (Big Pine Campground <br> If Bahia Honda is booked, try camping at the Big Pine Key Fishing Lodge just across the Bahia Honda Channel (305 872-2351). You can land at the boat ramp via the inlet parallel to U.S. 1. Sites 10 through 14 and 40 through 46 are tent sites right on the water. The campground has a convenience store, pool, and laundry. Bicycles can often be rented if one wants to ride the two or so miles to restaurants and a larger grocery store in Big Pine.)
Sandspur Beach Campground (Sandspur Beach Campground <br> This is a very popular state park, considered one of the top beaches in the world, so reserve campsites early. Prime tent sites along the Atlantic are in the Sandspur Camping Area. Non-electric beachside sites are 49 through 56. The more expensive electric sites are 64 through 72. There is also camping near the bridge in the Buttonwood Camping Area (sites 12 through 25 are electric sites along the water) and eight non-electric sites (cheaper) along Florida Bay in the Bayside Camping Area. Site #80 on the bay side is available to paddlers on a first-come, first-serve basis. Paddlers must first register at the park?s ranger station. If you plan to use the site, call the park at (305) 872-2353 on the morning of your planned arrival to ensure that the site will not be released for use by the general public. The site is held by the park until 3 p.m. each day to allow for paddlers to get a first shot.)
Knights Key Campground (You can camp at the privately-owned Knights Key Resort & Marina just before the Seven Mile Bridge. It can be accessed by either Sister?s Creek (just west of Sombrero Beach) or by taking the Atlantic side around Boot Key. There is spacious tent camping in the center of the campground and restaurants are within easy walking distance. Like most private Keys campgrounds, in can be pricey in the winter months. You must call ahead to reserve a spot and land at the manager?s campsite, which is site #9 (see gps coordinates on map). Access can be muddy and rocky at low tide. Call (800) 348-2267. 6.)
Curry Hammock State Park (Curry Hammock State Park. one walk up available. if we call a day in advance it will be reserved for us, or if it's not available they will make room for us. (305) 289-2690 Take a walk through the hardwood hammocks and view one of the largest populations of thatch palms in the United States. <br> http://www.reserveamerica.com/camping/curry-hammock-sp/r/campgroundDetails.do?contractCode=FL&parkId=281228)
Long Key (Camping in Long Key State Park is on the Atlantic side where you can reserve one of the park?s 60 scenic campsites in the campground (all bordering the Atlantic Ocean) or camp in one of the park?s six primitive campsites open to paddlers. You must reserve through Reserve America for the campground, or you can call the park headquarters up to 24 hours in advance to check on availability of the primitive sites: (305) 664-4815. The park also offers nature trails, an observation tower, and ranger led interpretative programs.)
Coconut Cove (http://www.coconutcove.net <br>)
John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park (Ground Campsite <br> http://floridastateparks.reserveamerica.com/camping/john-pennekamp-coral-reef-sp/r/campgroundDetails.do?contractCode=FL&parkId=281015)
Calusa Beach (Calusa Beach)
The beach at Marvin Keys (The beach at Marvin Keys is at 24°42.690 N, 81 °28.764 W and has a perfect sunrise view.)
The beach at Marvin Keys (The beach at Marvin Keys is at 24°42.690 N, 81 °28.764 W and has a perfect sunrise view.)
Tarpoon Creek (Some paddlers stay at an unauthorized campsite near a collapsed bridge along Tarpon Creek.)
West Content Key (A popular beach on the north· east point of the West Content Keys (C2) gets crowded on weekends and holidays, when recreational boaters pull their craft onto the tidal flats. There. There are signs of camping activity, although legally none is allowed within the National Key Deer Refuge. N 24°47.384' w 81 °29.064'.)
Money Key
Molasses Key (Primitive camping is on Molasses Key, a private island just over half way down the Seven Mile Bridge on the Atlantic side, but far enough away from the highway to avoid most of the traffic noise. <br> The smaller of the two islands of Molasses Key is recommended. Be mindful of swift currents and the potential for strong winds when crossing these open spans of water.)
Tom's Harbor Keys (Caution: At low water, tidal flats emerge offshore of Toms Harbor Keys. In order to land, paddlers may have to walk a few hundred feet across these flats.)
Tavernier Key (Many paddlers camp on Tavernier Key, but this island is private and formal approval for camping has not been granted.)
Dove Creek (There's some stealth camping at Dove Creek if you paddle up the creek a little ways (tenth of a mile) there are some houses on your right and a canal that goes off to the left where you could camp. It would be tricky getting up the bank and I haven't personally tried it but it's doable)
Dove Key
Boca Chita Key (Camping in Biscayne National Park)
Elliot Key (Camping in Biscayne National Park)
Snipes Key Bivvy (Snipes Key Bivvy)
Best Mud Creek Beach? (The central creek of the Mud Keys is at GPS coordinates N 24°40.376, W 81 °41.503. The best beach is at the terminus of this central creek.)
East Washerwoman Shoal (Six miles southwest of Key Colony Beach lays East Washerwoman Shoal. This site ranges in depth from 10 to 20 feet and is marked by a 36-foot tower. Snorkeling can be done in the shallow areas. Rose, brain, star and staghorn coral can all be seen on the sandy bottom of this Shoal. Waypoint: WASHER Latitude Longitude Degrees 24.6666666666667 -81.0708333333333 Degrees/Minutes N 24 40.000 W 81 4.250 Degrees/Minutes/Seconds N 24 40 0.000 W 81 4 15.000)
The Rocks (About three-quarters of a mile off of Plantation Point, The Rocks range in depth from 8 to 12 feet. This dive is just two and a half miles due east of Windley Key and is noted for its underwater coral garden. Snorkelers often utilize this area as the shallow depths make a clear view from the surface of the water. The area is also good for collecting lobsters or tropical fish as well as for shelling. Diving down in this site, one will find a bottom covered with seafans and many soft corals. This is an easy dive but doesn't offer nearly as much sea life as some of the others. This is a good dive for viewing many soft coral formations. <br> Waypoint: ROCKS Latitude Longitude Degrees 24.9436666666667 -80.537 Degrees/Minutes N 24 56.620 W 80 32.220 Degrees/Minutes/Seconds N 24 56 37.200 W 80 32 13.200)
Snorkeling (http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/best-keys-snorkeling.html Just south of Marathon is this fantastic park with mediocre beach snorkeling that is worth it nonetheless. http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/snorkeling-bahia-honda.html)
Snorkeling (Snorkeling)
Snorkeling (Snorkeling)
Snorkeling (Approximately 100 feet offshore from Pennekamp?s Cannon Beach, you can snorkel or glide over the remnants of an early Spanish shipwreck.)
Snorkeling (http://www.fla-keys.com/news/news.cfm?sid=8760 A hard-bottom coral community that grows beneath the waters on the island's east-facing side is a worthwhile snorkel stop, especially to see smaller organisms like banded shrimp, damselfish and juvenile angelfish. Precise location uncertain.)
Sand Key (Sand Key is marked with a lighthouse that stands 109' tall. The depth of the water ranges from 0' to 65'. There are 27 mooring buoys, S1 through S27.)
Davis Reef (DAVIS LEDGE <br> Depth: 15 to 85 feet - Experience: Novice - Coordinates: 24'55.320 N - 080'30.366 W. Davis Reef is located within a Sanctuary Preservation Area. There?s a statue of Buddha sitting in the sand here. There are mooring buoys.)
Cheeca Rocks (With major offshore reefs out of reach of kayaks and canoes, patch reefs at Cheeca Rocks (N24°54.1 00 ' W80°37.000') and Hen and Chickens (N24°56.040' W80°33.190') offer Upper Keys paddlers a rare opportunity to snorkel amid brain and star corals, sea whips, and sea fans in waters 3 to 10 feet deep. Bring a tether rope to tie your kayak up to one of the white mooring balls. A diver-down flag is required. Old Lat/Long: 24°54'14.65"N 80°36'53.09"W http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/best-keys-snorkeling.html This is a perfect snorkeling location. The depths are fantastic and the area is packed with medium sized fish and wonderful corals. http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/snorkeling-cheeca-rocks.html <br> Cheeca Rocks does not have a marker or light tower. The depth here ranges from 2' to 15'. There are seven mooring buoys.)
Looe Key Reef (http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/best-keys-snorkeling.html Looe Key Reef is yet another not-to-be missed Florida Keys snorkeling spot. But this spot is not for the faint of heart. It is a bit deep, and is right on the edge of the barrier reef. The fresh flows of ocean water attract large creatures here, which is why divers love the area. Giant Groupers and sharks are not uncommon sights here. http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/snorkeling-looe-key.html <br> Looe Key is located 10 nautical miles southwest of the Bahia Honda Channel and is marked by 70 buoys. Depths range from 5 to 70 feet, with deeper areas of the dive occasionally having dangerous currents. In 1744, the HMS Looe ran aground in 25 feet of water. While little is left of the ship, a ballast pile and anchor chain can be found on the eastern end.)
Hens and Chickens (With major offshore reefs out of reach of kayaks and canoes, patch reefs at Cheeca Rocks (N24°54.1 00 ' W80°37.000') and Hen and Chickens (N24°56.040' W80°33.190') offer Upper Keys paddlers a rare opportunity to snorkel amid brain and star corals, sea whips, and sea fans in waters 3 to 10 feet deep. Bring a tether rope to tie your kayak up to one of the white mooring balls. A diver-down flag is required. Old Lat/Long: 24°56'7.44"N 80°32'58.20"W http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/best-keys-snorkeling.html This is another patch reef area that was wonderful. This site is remarkable for all of it's healthy hard corals and sponges and interesting underwater topography. http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/snorkeling-hen-and-chickens.html <br> Hen and Chickens Reef is marked with a 35' tall light tower on the outside edge of the reef. It has the number 40 on it. The depth of the water ranges from 3' to 35'. There are lots of mooring buoys, but I don?t know exactly how many.)
Coffins Patch (http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/best-keys-snorkeling.html From Marathon you can get a boat ride out to snorkel the Coffins Patch area. We snorkeled two different spots in the Coffins Patch, and both were good. These locations are often combined in one boat trip. The first was The Donut. This is a better diving than snorkeling spot because it is a little deep. But we still really enjoyed it for it's amazing profusion of sponges. The second spot is called The Stake. This is a much better snorkeling spot, because it is less deep. http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/snorkeling-coffins-patch.html)
Sombrero Reef (and Lighthouse) (http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/best-keys-snorkeling.html You can't miss this, it may be the best Keys snorkeling spot. This wonderful spur-and-groove reef is full of interesting topography to explore and many fish and corals to see. http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/snorkeling-sombrero-reef.html <br> SOMBRERO KEY REEF - Depth: 5 to 50 feet - Experience: Novice. A gathering of 11 mooring buoys are located on the ocean side (south side) of the light. With a depth range of 5-35 feet, this spot is great for divers of all levels and snorklers too)
Alligator Reef Lighthouse (http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/best-keys-snorkeling.html Farther out in bluer water is the amazing Alligator Reef Lighthouse. This is a great snorkeling spot. There is a tall lighthouse structure, and thousands upon thousands of fish congregate underneath it for all the shade it offers. It is a fairly shallow area that is a joy to explore. There is also a second area that you should snorkel while at the lighthouse. It is a deeper canyon wall just east of the lighthouse. Very deep but full of big creatures! http://www.tropicalsnorkeling.com/snorkeling-alligator-reef.html <br> Alligator Reef is marked by a 136' tall lighthouse. The depth here ranges from 6' to 70'. There are 10 mooring buoys, A1 thru A10.)
Patch Coral (Patch Coral)
Patch Coral (Patch Coral)
Patch Coral (Patch Coral)
Patch Coral (Patch Coral)
Patch Coral (Patch Coral)
Patch Coral (Patch Coral)
Patch Coral (Patch Coral)
Shipwreck
Brick Barge (Average Rating: 3.5 stars Average Depth: 20 ft. / 6 m Max Depth: 28 ft. / 9 m Features: Coral Reef Wreck Site Good Snorkeling <br> Brick Barge is a small iron ship that lies on the north side of Hen and Chickens Reef. This barge was torpedoed during World War II and now lies in 20 to 28 feet of water. Because of its location, the Barge lies in a picturesque environment surrounded by large amounts of sea life. In the area are large boulders of brain coral and iridescent tropical fish. This is a great spot for photography as the combination of the sunken barge and the reef make an impressive sight.)
Herrata Wreck (Average Depth: 15 ft. / 5 m Max Depth: 18 ft. / 5 m Features: Coral Reef Wreck Site Good Snorkeling <br> Today, all that remains of this ship is a ballast pile that lies on a grassy seabed. It is in 18 feet of water and near Snake Greek Bridge. The site has acquired the nickname, "Figurine Wreck" for the countless relics that have been removed thus far. Among the findings are cannon balls, pottery shards, clay bowls, animal hides, and many small clay animals. If these figurines are of interest to a diver, focusing on the northeast area of the ballast pile is advisable.)
USS Alligator (This 86-foot ship was attempting to protect a convoy from being raided by pirates when it sank in 1825. Salvaged after going aground, the crew decided it would be best to blow up the ship in order to protect her from further pirating. The remains of the ship are two piles of ballast stones and the lower hull which make their home a few hundred feet on the ocean side of the Alligator Reef Lighthouse. The remains are in shallow water with the deepest reaching only 12 feet, and the shallowest just 3 feet below the surface. This makes the site great for divers and snorkelers. Due to its placement however, the site has been worn down by the natural weather patterns in the area as well as by frequent usage. This site is a great historic treasure. The ship sunk before modifications or large-scale repairs could take place and is the only remaining vessel that represents the construction used in the peacetime Navy that arose after the War of 1812. <br> Average Depth: 8 ft. / 2 m Max Depth: 12 ft. / 4 m Features: Coral Reef Wreck Site Good Snorkeling)
Thiorva Wreck (At the north end of Turtle Reef, this wreck lies in 10 - 15 feet of water, making it a great site for snorkeling. This unidentified wreck may be the remains of an old schooner. Not much is known about the wreck. Her anchor, a cannon or two, and a few metal objects remain. A name plate bearing the name Thiorva was found on the site in the 1950's.)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Shipwreck)
Shipwreck (Approximately 100 feet offshore from Pennekamp?s Cannon Beach, you can snorkel or glide over the remnants of an early Spanish shipwreck.)
Calusa Beach (Calusa Beach)
Big Munson lagoon (Big Munson lagoon)
wild bird center beach (Laura Quinn has devoted her retirement years and life savings to the protection of injured and orphaned pelicans, hawks, ibis, owls, egrets, and spoonbills on her private, five-acre sanctuary known as the Wild Bird Center)
Sandspur beach (Sandspur beach)
Sombrero Beach (Make sure to use the kayak launch site on the west side of the swimming beach.)
Bahia Honda beach (The low-tide beach at Go-to 1 (C4) makes a good rest spot or a destination unto itself. The occasional powerboaters bring lawn chairs, but more often than not it is a quiet place. It's also the last reliable rest stop on the Gulf side of Bahia Honda.)
Upper Snipe Key mangroves (Few places in the Keys rival the mangroves south of Snipe Point for sheer complexity and beauty. The clean, clear water of so many small creeks is a window to a world of red calcareous algae, sponges. soft corals, and fish. The aqua-blue channels that dissect this chain of small islands are quiet and distinctly beautiful.)
Tom's Harbor Keys (Small mangrove shoots and clumps are spreading through nearshore waters oceanside at Grassy Key's north end (Go-to 2, B2). Amid this soft shoreline, a kayaker can weave a boat through mangrove forest sheltered from sun and wind.)
Toilet Seat Pass (Toilet Seat Pass)
Water Key's Western Shore (The marshy mangrove fringes of Water Key's western shore (D4, E4) deserve hours of exploring unto themselves.)
Southernmost Point (You may want to stop for a photo at the southernmost point in the continental United States, identified by a huge red-topped metal marker just past South Beach.)
Sawyer Keys (The Sawyer Keys are part of a line of pristine islands that mark a divide between the Gulf of Mexico and the Backcountry (we call it the "edge of the nearshore waters"). With interior creeks off-limits, circumnaviga· tion IS a paddler's only option for the Sawyer Keys (Go-to 4, Sawyer North, B4) Wide, stirring vistas of the Gulf of Mexico from the north side of Sawyer are ample reward for a long day's paddle.)
7 Mile Bridge (7 Mile Bridge)
San Pedro Underwater State Park (Just to the southwest of the park is the San Pedro Underwater Archeological Preserve State Park. In good weather, you can glide over or snorkel the remains of a 1733 Spanish treasure ship, which lies in 18 feet of water. Look for the five white mooring buoys marking the site approximately 1.25 miles south of Indian Key. You can tie your kayak to these while snorkeling. <br> <br> Link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B22y8q2u9-m3dm9DMHJYWC0tX1k <br> Original Lat/Long: 24°51'9.00"N 80°40'27.48"W <br> <br> https://www.floridastateparks.org/park/san-pedro <br> New Lat/Long from Park website: 24°51'48.12"N 80°40'47.70"W <br> <br> This underwater archaeological preserve features a submerged shipwreck that is available for diving and snorkeling. Part of a Spanish flotilla, the San Pedro was a 287-ton, Dutch-built ship which sank in a hurricane on July 13, 1733. Her remains were discovered in 1960 in Hawk Channel near Indian Key. After major salvage efforts in the 1960s, all that remains of San Pedro is a large pile of ballast stones covering an area 90 feet long and 30 feet wide. The underwater site has been enhanced with seven replica cannons, an anchor, and an information plaque. Visitors can also appreciate the marine life that occupies the site. Located in 18 feet of water, approximately 1.25 nautical miles south from Indian Key at GPS coordinates 24 degrees 51.802'N, 80 degrees 40.795'W. To prevent anchor damage, please tie up to mooring buoys located at the site.)
Mangrove Creeks ((not really possible to access unless backtracking if staying at Long Key campsite).)
Little Bahia Honda (Beach. The island's rocky sur- face makes it a less-than-ideal place to sun- bathe. Snorkeling around the island is popular.)
Indian Key (Designated kayak landing. http://www.fla-keys.com/news/news.cfm?sid=8760 A trip to Indian Key is considered an overall water-based adventure. Enthusiasts can kayak from Robbie's Marina, paddling 25 minutes to the island to explore the remains of what was once the Keys' largest settlement outside Key West. A hard-bottom coral community that grows beneath the waters on the island's east-facing side is a worthwhile snorkel stop, especially to see smaller organisms like banded shrimp, damselfish and juvenile angelfish.)
Indian Key Observation Tower (Indian Key Observation Tower)
Mud Key Middle (Mud Key Middle)
Mud Keys North (Mud Keys North)
Mud Key South (Mud Key South)
Big Torch Mangroves (Big Torch Mangroves)
Fort Zachory Taylor Historic State Park (You can only land at a kayak launch spot on the eastern end of the park?s beach near a kayak concessionaire if you notify the park in advance and state that you are a long-distance paddler in need of a rest stop or being picked up: (305) 292-6713. You need to check in at the admissions gate before using the park. Normally, only those day users who have launched from the park are allowed to land at the park.)
Cutoe Key magroves & habitats (Mangroves are slowly overgrowing tidal flats at the south end of Cutoe Key (Go·tos 1, 2). The creeks here are some of the most extensive and accessible in the Lower Keys . Nature: A trip around Cutoe Key presents con- trasting views of two bottom types typical of the Lower Keys: hard bottom and sea grass. On Cutoe's east side the bottom appears as flat, misshaped plates of rock strewn about like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. A thin coat of gray silt covers the bottom and the plant life. This is pre- ferred habitat for whelks, sea stars, black sponges, and soft and hard corals, to name a few. By contrast, in sea grass meadows that pre- dominate off the western shore of Cutoe and Annette, the bottom is soft. Here, a web of life, from small shrimp and young fish to hungry sharks, relies on the seagrass beds for shelter and food during formative years.)
Cowpen's Sanctuary (See Chart 1 4 for details on paddling Tavernier Creek (AS, A6) (Paddler's Atlas). A local doctor, paddler, and WWOW (Wild Woman on the Water) is the namesake for Dr. May's Incision (8S), a mangrove creek reached at Go-to S. At its most narrow, paddlers must break down their paddle to squeeze through. Toilet Seat Pass (A4) is a cut through a mud bank lined with dozens of toilet seats installed by residents and painted with family and business names, anniversaries, memorial seven the name of a local Boy Scout troop. Go-to 4 is the north side of the pass. Extensive mangrove swamps spread southeast of Cowpens Cut (A4). Numerous small creeks flow through grass beds and mangroves, and shallow water throughout makes ideal conditions for bird and marine life viewing.)
Coupon Bight Preserve and Great Heron NWF (On the Atlantic side of the keys, look for circular domed formations which are living coral patch reefs. By snorkeling, you can spot brightly-colored tropical fish along with larger grouper, snapper, snook and barracuda. Besides providing necessary habitat for marine life, patch reefs such as these baffle wave energy, thus helping to provide storm protection for the islands.)
Bahia Honda state Park (Bahia Honda State Park is famous for its white sand beaches and one-of-a-kind view of the sunset. The entire island lies within the park. There are hiking trails, picnic areas, snorkel- ing and diving concessions, cabins, developed campsites, and a primitive camping area.)
Florida Bay Outfitters (104050 Overseas Hwy, Key Largo, FL 33037)
City Marina (1801 N Roosevelt Blvd, Key West, FL 33040)